Being a Writer · Canada · Health · Inspiration · Nature · Norse Myths · Photography

Enjoying Skadi’s Wonderland

Winter in Canada can be harsh. The Polar Vortex, a mass of dense arctic air, is often blamed for the bone chilling deep freeze that courses over most of the country between the months of December and March.

But, with the right gear and a love of nature, one can easily find wonder in the frozen landscapes that stretch to the horizon and paint the land in endless shades of white.

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Frozen lake of Two Mountains, Eastern Canada. May K. Hella

 

In Norse paganism, The goddess Skaði (a giantess who, for a time married Njörðr, the god of seafaring, wealth, and wind) is associated with all things winter, skiing, and bowhunting. Her father, Thiazi, was killed by the gods, and Odin the All-Father atoned for his death by tossing Thiazi’s eyes to the heavens. The giant has since been gazing upon his daughter from the starlit sky, and will continue to do so for all of eternity.

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Skadi creative board. Saved from Tumblr via Pinterest.

 

I love the silence that comes with the muted landscapes of winter. Often times nothing but the creaking and groaning of the wind on bare branches can be hear.

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The rays of a dying sun glow in the dusk, casting golden shadows across the sky.

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A four o’clock sunset in and around the Winter Solstice. May k. Hella
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Golden clouds reflect onto the surface of dark water. Sunset. May K. Hella

 

Beauty is everywhere. And if you look carefully, you find the roads less traveled by men are seldom empty.

 

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Rabbit, hare, and squirrel tracks abound by a silent creek. May K. Hella

 

face1This winter bundle up and take some time to enjoy nature, away from the beaten tracks.  Life is beautiful, and you are part of it. Spending time outdoors not only oxygenates your body, it also helps to reduce stress and is proven to enhance and regulate your mood. Nature fills you with the wonders of creation and connects you with the past—nature and mankind’s.

 

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